Town of Greenville Comprehensive Plan

2009 Update

 

  

Prepared for:

 

Greenville Town Council

 

By:

  

Floyd County Planner’s Office, March 2009

 

 

Table of Contents

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

TABLE OF CONTENT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

STATEMEN OF POLICIES

 

INTRODUCTION

 

INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS

Regional Context

History of Greenville

Social and Economic Characteristics

Existing Transportation Patterns

Existing Land Use and Development Framework

 

 

LAND USE PLAN

Proposed Land Use Element

Transportation Element

 

GOALS, OBJECTIVES, IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

Implementation Policy

Goals, Objectives, and Strategies

APPENDIX A

  1. Implementation Matrix
  2. Reference

 

Acknowledgement

 

The Town would like to acknowledge those who participated in the Comprehensive Plan process for Greenville. This plan would not have been possible without the dedicated members of Greenville’s Town Council and their interest in shaping the future of their town.

 

 

 

Greenville Town Council Members

Council Member Ward 1:        Randal Johnes

Council Member Ward 2:        Talbotte Richardson

Council Member Ward 3:        Hanzel Barclay

Council Member At Large:      Patti Hays

Council Member At Large:      Bob Wright

Clerk / Treasurer:                    Jack Travillian

 

 

Floyd County Planner’s Office

 

Don Lopp

Edna Kubala

 

Executive Summary

The Town's Comprehensive Plan is the chief tool to enable the management of growth and the delivery of public services in a timely and efficient manner for its citizens. For many years, Greenville had a development pattern clustered around U.S. 150, which it maintained since it’s founding in 1816. Beginning in the mid 1980’s, the Town began to experience growth on its outskirts as a result of the expansion of nearby metropolitan areas (New Albany, Louisville, Jeffersonville). As the Town continues to grow, the challenge is to direct growth appropriately to retain the qualities that residents have come to cherish.

 

New residents are attracted by a distinctness that is not found elsewhere in the region - the topography and rural heritage, a rich sense of community, numerous historic homes, and a quality of life that is not expected in this day and age. In order to maintain this setting, it is important to plan for the future.

 

Planning is a process of formulating goals and the land use policies necessary to achieve them. The Town's Comprehensive Plan is a valuable tool to Town government, its citizens and the private sector. It is an articulation of policy from the Town Council which describes a vision for the future which allows the Council and the Town’s Municipal Planning Commission to coordinate their policies and actions to guide Town development. The major purposes of the Comprehensive Plan are to:

 

·        Provide a guide for the decisions that create the future Town environment;

·        Promote the interests of the citizens at-large;

·        Enhance the Town's environmental resources;

·        Develop a coordinated, well-planned system of public services and utilities; and evaluate short-term actions against long-term goals.

 

The major issue facing Greenville today is finding a balance between growth and economic stability, while maintaining the Town's small-town character. The Town's Comprehensive Plan provides policy guidance for addressing future issues within the context of the framework of the Plan, including environmental resources; population and housing; transportation; water and sewer; economic development; land use; community facilities; parks and recreation; historic preservation; and urban design and community appearance.

 

Land Use Plan

 

Greenville is located in the rolling hills of rural southern Indiana. The Town was platted in 1816 by Andrew Mundall and Benjamin Haines. Greenville is just outside the urban areas of Louisville and New Albany. Its scenic location among the rolling hills of southern Indiana has encouraged development over the last twenty years. This plan seeks to create development standards that would protect the environmentally sensitive areas of Greenville and maintain a good transition between different land uses.

 

Greenville has maintained a steady population of about 508 for many years, grew to 591 for the 2000 census, and is projected by the Census Bureau to be 580 for 2007. As there is a limited amount of land for development within the town’s limits, future growth for the Town will come from the areas of redevelopment or infill development and through annexation.  Due to the nature of the office of County Planner and a potential conflict of interests, the issue of annexation was not further addressed in the creation of this plan.

 

Recent economic and housing conditions have created an environment where expansive residential growth is seen to be limited. Population projects suggest that the population of Greenville will be approximately 700 by 2030 which is an annual growth rate 1.8 percent.  This projection, however, does not take into consideration the limited amount of vacant land within the Town limits and the current lack of sanitary sewers within the Town to encourage higher density development. The characteristics of Greenville’s future population are similar to those found elsewhere in the region. The main employments are manufacturing, retail, finance, and general services. The median household income is $49,000 which is higher than the county’s median income at $44,022. About 36% of the population over 25 has earned a High School Diploma, and 15% has earned a Bachelors Degree.

 

The Town's housing stock has changed considerably in recent decades. The central town area has mostly single-family historic homes built prior to 1980. Newer homes have been built surrounding the town. Greenville boasts a high owner occupancy rate of 91.5% for housing units. With an average listing price of $246,146 in Greenville, the challenge of the future is to reduce housing costs and continue having high rates of home ownership.

 

In comparing the town’s median age to that of the county and nation, we used American Community Survey data from 2000. Greenville’s median age is 37, higher than Floyd County (36.8), Indiana (35.2), and the nation (35.3). An above average age has created the challenge of planning for an aging population in a town that has no alternate transportation or housing options.

 

The Town should prepare to accommodate the housing needs of a graying community. The Town should explore special initiatives for that particular group by obtaining grants for housing rehabilitation and new construction.

 

Land Use Plan

 

The Land Use Plan provides a blueprint of the current and future land use pattern of Greenville. The Land Use Plan indicates what particular types of uses the Town presently has and provides expectations of future development. The plan is a precursor or guide to the development of the Town’s Zoning Ordinance.  The Zoning Ordinance is regulatory document and sets out a range of uses, which are permitted and is used to implement the Plan. The Land Use Plan is intended to guide development over a long period of time.

 

The Town’s plan proposes a land use classification system that works in concert with its Transportation Plan and Economic Development Plan. Once a Town Zoning Ordinance is implemented future rezoning requests must by Indiana State Code review the application in context of the land use plan.

 

Transportation Plan

 

The reason for the Town's continual growth is that it is possible to enjoy a small-town quality of life within a reasonable commuting distance of nearby metropolitan areas. The backbone of the transportation system is U.S. 150 which runs East-West through the town. The average commuting time to work for Greenville residents is 20-34 minutes (2000 Census). The challenge for the future is to move traffic throughout the Town while retaining a sense of scale and place; examine the need for public transportation; to design streets that don't adversely affect the neighborhoods and to incorporate commercial signage that does not poise a safety issue or diminishes the historic nature of the town.

 

Infrastructure Plan

 

The sizing and location of utilities need to follow the Town's plans for development.

From information gathered through the Town, it appears the Town will have adequate access to water resources to meet the future development needs of the community. 

 

In terms of sanitary sewers, the Town presently does not operate or maintain a sanitary sewer system.  However, there are two sewer treatment facilities located in the area.  The New Albany-Floyd County School System operates a small package plant for the Greenville Elementary School and Theineman Environmental has been permitted to operate a 100,000 gallon package plant facility for the Heritage Springs development located adjacent to Town.

 

A careful and thoughtful engineering and financial analysis should be considered to determine the future sanitary sewer needs for the community.  The expansion of sanitary sewers allows for higher intensity and density of uses within an area which can have the indirect effect of changing the rural character the Town seems to embrace. Any potential expansion should thoroughly examine the financial, engineering, environmental costs, public costs and benefits associated with the development of this type of utility.

 

Greenville is presently outside the federal and state MS 4 requirements.  As these requirements change and more communities are required to comply with the federal clean water requirements, the Town should proactively move towards investigating their storm water drainage needs and how the Town can proactively comply with future storm water regulations.  From public input, a drainage way located in the central part of the community has experienced flooding issues. A detailed engineering analysis should be considered to mitigate the flooding effects.

 

Economic Development Plan

 

While the economy of the surrounding area has seen a decline in agricultural development, Greenville still serves the surrounding community as a small retail and personal services center.  The Town does have a competitive advantage regarding being strategic location on the US 150 corridor to serve the commuting traffic from other areas such as Palmyra and Paoli.

 

 The challenge is to maintain and improve the Town's function as part of a community serving retail and service center. Encouraging small entrepreneurs and attracting more professional service providers in the medical, financial, and legal professions should be a main component of the town’s economic efforts.  The lack of adequate sanitary sewer and hi-speed infrastructure limits the development of areas as major industrial or business parks.  Other areas within the County have competitive advantages in areas such as proximity to Interstate transportation, municipal sanitary sewer available with capacity and accessibility to hi-speed internet connections to put the town at a significant disadvantage in the development of these types of services.

 

Community Facilities and Park Recreation Plan

 

The Town's existing facilities include Greenville Park, which is operated by Floyd County. Additional Recreational facilities in the vicinity of the town are operated by the school system. The goal is to increase accessibility of existing parks and foster partnerships with Floyd County to increase programs and activities in these parks. To address future demands of the Town, the following community facilities are needed:

 

·        The development of a community center;

·        The development of smaller neighborhood parks, on the east and west segments of town.  This would supplement the current park system and provide additional recreational opportunities.

 

Historic Preservation Plan

 

The Town's historical homes are an extremely important component of life in Greenville, and this plan hopes to address future renovations and developments within this area. This plan addresses the option of taking part in the Main Street Program, and working with the Historic Preservation Commission.  A recently completed Historic Inventory by Historic Landmarks of Southern Indiana provides greater detail on the scope and depth of historic structures located in the Town. 

 

A well-designed urban environment enhances everyone's economic, social and spiritual well-being. The plan proposes to maintain Greenville’s traditional town character, beautify the major entranceways into the Town, protect scenic views and important landmarks, develop guidelines for residential and non-residential development, and work with developers to improve design.

 

Town of Greenville’s Statements of Policies

 

Per Indiana Code IS 36-7-4-502 a community’s comprehensive plan must include statements of policy for land use development, future public facilities and community land use goals. This statement of policy for land use development is the formulation of the principles that the community views as important in land use development. The Town of Greenville Statement of Policy reads as follows:

 

Statement of Policy for Land Use Development”

 

It is the policy of the Town of Greenville Comprehensive Plan to improve the health, safety and welfare of the citizens of Greenville by providing for planned community growth in areas best suited for development while safeguarding open space, farmlands, floodplains and other natural resources and to provide other economic development opportunities along with a continued high quality of life. The plan will also provide for maintenance and development of public ways, public spaces, public lands, public structures and public utilities for the benefit of the community and in preparation for the needs of future population growth.

 

In considering development applications to alter the Comprehensive Plan, the Town shall have the opportunity to consider several elements necessary to ensure proper land use planning is occurring.  In this consideration, the Town should review any alternation using the following criteria. Below are the elements that the Town should consider.

  • Nuisance potential to existing or planned future land uses
  • Proximity to existing like-use development
  • Population density
  • Proximity to supporting land uses
  • Traffic patterns and thoroughfare plan
  • Public safety systems including fire protection and law enforcement
  • Water and sanitation systems capacities and costs
  • Public school system
  • Topographic and geologic characteristics
  • Preservation of natural characteristics including sightlines
  • Site drainage
  • Loss of agricultural usage
  • And any other factor reasonably related to protect the health, safety and general welfare of the public or further the interests of the Comprehensive Plan

 

The second required component of the Comprehensive Plan is a statement of policy regarding the development of public ways, public spaces, public structures, and public utilities.

 

“Statement of Policy regarding Development of Public Ways, Places, Structures and Utilities”

 

The Town of Greenville deems the development of public ways, places, and structures an intricate component of land use and community development process. The Town of Greenville will proceed with the development of these public ways, places and structures in an efficient and effective manner for the betterment of the community’s interests as a whole.

  

INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS

             

Greenville is located slightly west of the geographic center of Greenville Township. The city finds itself on the edge of the expanding metropolitan areas of New Albany, Jeffersonville and Louisville. These urbanized areas continue to spread north and west along the I-64 corridor. Greenville is located within a twenty-minute drive of Louisville, Jeffersonville and New Albany and vehicular access is good along U.S. Highway 150 and its interchange with I-64. The regional link to the Louisville, Jeffersonville and New Albany areas has created a demand for a variety of housing in a rural and small town setting. The regional links to the north and south of Greenville are poor and expansion along those routes has been minimal.

 

HISTORY OF GREENVILLE

 

 Greenville has a varied and rich history beginning in the early days of statehood. The town was actually ranked as a village for half a century. Its beginnings came naturally as a stop along the buffalo trail now named “Buffalo Trace.” Later, this trail became the Vincennes Road connecting Louisville and New Albany to the fort and settlement of Vincennes.

 

Andrew Mundall, a school teacher from Kentucky first came across the Ohio River about 1806-07. Traveling up the old Native American trail, he settled on 160 acres of land upon which part the town now stands. In those days, what would become US 150 was no more than a mud road, winding among trees and stumps. Mundall and Haines cleared some land, joined their efforts, and laid out a town, dividing the future profits and losses between them. Together, they filed the first plat of Greenville May 31, 1816 in what was then, Clark County. They laid out the town in the form of a parallelogram with a public square in the center of town at the intersection of Cross Street and the Vincennes Trail. Greenville was surveyed by George Smith, the county surveyor, and incorporated October 28, 1879.

 

Picture of old Paoli Vincennes Stagecoach: Courtesy of www.nafclibrary.org Archive Pictures

 

The old road was an important thoroughfare in those days as it linked Vincennes with the Falls of the Ohio, New Albany and Louisville. Many towns sprung up along the stagecoach routes in order to serve the needs of travelers for taverns and other amenities. The Paoli stagecoach passed through Greenville every day along the 104 miles that separated Vincennes and New Albany. It alternated going west one day, east the next. It carried passengers and mail and made its daily stop in the new village. The Greenville Post Office was established in 1823, Moses Kirkpatrick is presumed to be its first postmaster. To serve the stagecoach passengers, a log tavern was erected on the public square where north and south road crossed the turnpike. Hotels and numerous businesses were soon formed to meet the needs of a growing populace.

 

During its most prosperous times in 1900 to 1908, Greenville boasted a host of amenities for both travelers and residents. At that time the town had the following: a brass band, orchestra, theatrical club, a dry goods store, millinery store, a featherbed cleaning business, three doctors, seven grocery stores, a bakery shop, a flour mill, an undertaker, a livery, a shoe shop and a harness shop. When the town was laid out, the proprietors reserved a lot for a school near where the Methodist church still stands. Later, a seminary was built on a lot of one acre in town donated by Mr. Isaac Redman. The building of brick was erected at cost of $2800.

 

John B. Ford was a well known person from Greenville. In addition to owning the saddle shop, the tin safe shop, a firing mill, tannery, and brick yard, he was the first man to make plate glass in the United States. In 1865, just after the Civil War, he built a factory by the Ohio Riverbank called Star Glass Works, which later become known as the New Albany Glass Works. The first plate glass window ever made in the United States was made there and installed in a store at 318 Pearl Street in New Albany, IN. Mr. Ford also built the grain mill on Main Street in 1810, one of the most historically recognizable buildings in Greenville. The building still stands.

 

Greenville became such a significant location in population and importance that it once received the honor of competing with New Albany for the selection of the Floyd County seat. A competition was held between the two towns to determine who could make the greatest contribution to the county. A writer of his day, C.W. Cottom wrote that New Albany “offered a few dollars the larger sum, and then adding the donation of a bell for the courthouse.”

Picture of John B Ford: Courtesy of the New Albany- Floyd County Library

 

 

Although Greenville did not win the competition, it was still described favorably in the History of the Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties as “a very pretty town in a very healthy location, undisturbed by the scream and thunder of the locomotive or the excitement generally attending the administration of justice.”

 

Probably the most significant historical event in Greenville would involve the fire of 1908. The fire started March 26, 1908 at Mary K. Wood’s house as she was ironing clothes and was said to have been caused by a defective flue. As the fire spread in her house, burning shingles lit other houses on fire. While no one was killed, all but two original buildings and businesses burned to the ground. Most of the businesses could not afford to rebuild, and that combined with the change from stagecoach to automobile transportation hindered Greenville’s ability to recover during the next several decades.

 

From 1970 - 2000, Greenville has had a population increase. With the growth of population in the Louisville suburban area, new developments have been expanding westward from New Albany at a steady pace. Those moving to Greenville and the surrounding areas generally seek to live in a more rural atmosphere and commute to work in the metro area.

 

 

SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS

 

Population and household data provides a means to analyze the past, current and future trends within Greenville. A brief analysis of available data is provided which will provide a base of information for planning public services and facilities.

 

Population and household information has been examined and utilized to help Greenville prepare for the impact of future urban growth. The size and rate of the population within the community is an important factor in the comprehensive planning process. The faster and larger a city, town, or county grows, the greater the demand becomes for additional social services and community facilities.

 

Floyd County in 1980 has a population of 61,169 persons, in 1990 Floyd County had grown to a population of 64,404 persons, and in 2000 Floyd County had a population of 70,823 persons. From 1980 to 1990 the growth rate was approximately 5.3 percent and from 1990 to 2000 the growth rate increased to 10.0 percent. This was double the previous decade’s rate of growth, yet still lower than Greenville’s growth from 1990 to 2000. Indiana grew at 9.7 percent over the same 1990 to 2000 time period.

 

Greenville in 1990 had a population of 508 persons which grew to 591 persons in 2000. This is an increase of more than 16.3 percent in this ten-year period (from 1990 to 2000). This is significantly higher than either the state rate of 9.7 percent or the county rate of 10 percent. The data is compared to the other areas of Floyd County in the following table.

 

Geographical Area Total Population People to Total Population Median Age (Years)
Under 18 Years 18 to 24 Years 25 to 44 Years 45 to 64 Years 65 Years and Over
Floyd County 70,823 25.8 8.4 29.9 23.6 12.3 36.8
Franklin Township 1,290 25.9 6.6 31.4 26.1 10.0 37.7
Georgetown Township 8,337 28.2 7.4 30.9 26.1 7.5 36.9
Greenville Township 6,340 29.4 6.9 31.7 25.2 6.8 36.2
Lafayette Township 6,378 27.2 7.1 28.4 28.1 9.2 38.5
New Albany Township 48,476 24.8 9.0 29.7 22.2 14.4 36.6
Franklin city 19,463 26 12 30 17 16 33
Galena CDP 1,831 31.68 6.12 34.74 21.46 6.01 33.8
Georgetown town 2,227 28 8 34 24 6 33.9
Greenville town 591 28.43 4.40 31.30 23.52 12.35 37
New Albany city 37,603 24.02 9.57 29.23 21.76 15.42 36.6

Table 1: Population Trends

 

Household Trends

 

According to the 1990 Census, the average household size in the United States was 2.63 persons. In 1990 Greenville’s average household size was slightly higher than the national average with 2.77 persons. In 2000 the Town of Greenville average 2.64 persons per household. In 2000, Floyd County averages 2.54 persons per household. The State of Indiana was very similar at 2.53 persons per household.

Although the persons per household dropped significantly from 1990 to 2000, the total number of households has increased. In 1990 there were 183 households in Greenville. In 2000 the number of households in Greenville was 224. This is an increase of 22.4 percent.

 

Geographic Area   Family Household Non Family Households Average Size
  Total Married Couple Family Female Householder, no husband   Householder living alone Households Families
Total Households Number Percent with own Children under 18 Number Percent with own children under 18 Number Percent with own children under 18 Total Total 65 Years and Older
Floyd County 27511 18707.0 46.5 15321.0 45.0 3434.0 61.6 7664.0 3454.0 2402.0 2.54 3.00
Franklin Township 460 372.0 41.9 324.0 41.0 30.0 50.0 88.0 69.0 24.0 2.81 3.11
Georgetown Township 2919 2463.0 50.0 2146.0 48.6 225.0 62.7 456.0 380.0 133.0 2.86 3.12
Georgetown 794 656.0 53.2 543.0 51.4 85.0 64.7 138.0 117.0 35.0 2.80 3.09
Greenville Township 2199 1863.0 53.6 1637.0 51.9 100.0 68.1 335.0 280.0 95.0 2.99 3.15
Galena CDP 622 539.0 55.7 462.0 54.1 62.0 67.7 83.0 68.0 16.0 2.94 3.19
Greenville town 224 174.0 50.6 146.0 49.3 18.0 66.7 50.0 44.0 26.0 2.64 3.03
Lafayette Township 2236 1891.0 48.2 1683.0 46.9 140.0 56.4 345.0 288.0 118.0 2.86 3.12
New Albany Township 19698 13118.0 47.7 9441.0 42.8 2863.0 61.5 6580.0 5437.0 2031.0 2.41 2.93
New Albany city 19959 10059.0 47.0 6787.0 40.4 2567.0 62.1 5900.0 4917.0 1875.0 2.31 2.88

Table 2: Household Trends Census 2000

 

Economic Characteristics

 

The objective of this section is to provide Greenville with a solid base of information for planning public services and facilities. While the social characteristics section focused on population and households, this section focuses on people, employment, income, housing, and education.

 

In 2000 the U.S. Bureau of the Census recorded that the majority of Greenville workers were employed in the areas of manufacturing, retail, finance and general services. Even though the area is defined by its rural character, farming and agriculture are not listed as employment in Greenville. Without employment in the agricultural sector, Greenville needs to concentrate on preserving the rural character through conservation and educating the public on how important it is to retain these remaining agricultural areas.

 

 .

Total Employment by Industry Greenville town, Indiana
Total Percent
Management, professional, and related occupations: 100 38.0
Management, business, and financial operations occupations: 54 20.5
Management occupations, except farmers and farm managers 49 18.6
Business and financial operations occupations: 5 1.9
Business operations specialists 3 1.1
Financial specialists 2 0.8
Professional and related occupations: 46 17.5
Computer and mathematical occupations 6 2.3
Architecture and engineering occupations: 11 4.2
Architects, surveyors, cartographers, and engineers 8 3.0
Drafters, engineeering, and mapping technicians 3 1.1
Life, physical, and social science occupations 1 0.4
Community and social services occupations 3 1.1
Education, training, and library occupations 12 4.6
Healthcare practitioners and technical occupations: 13 4.9
Health diagnosing and treating practitioners and technical occupations 9 3.4
Health technologists and technicians 4 1.5
Service occupations: 26 9.9
Protective service occupations: 2 0.8
Fire fighting, prevention, and law enforcement workers, including supervisors 2 0.8
Food preparation and serving related occupations 16 6.1
Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations 7 2.7
Personal care and service occupations 1 0.4
Sales and office occupations: 61 23.2
Sales and related occupations 25 9.5
Office and administrative support occupations 36 13.7
Construction, extraction, and maintenance occupations: 26 9.9
Construction and extraction occupations 13 4.9
Supervisors, construction and extraction workers 2. 0.8
Construction trades workers 11 4.2
Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations 13 4.9
Production, transportation, and material moving occupations: 50 19.0
Production occupations 31 11.8
Transportation and material moving occupations 19 7.2
Aircraft and traffic control occupations 5 1.9
Rail, water and other transportation occupations 2 0.8
Material moving workers 12 4.6

                        Table 3: Employment by Industry Census 2000

 

According to the 2000 U.S. Bureau of Census the median household income for Greenville was $49,000. The median household income for Floyd County was $49,022. The median household income for the State in 1999 was $41,567. In 1990, the U.S. Bureau of the Census reported that there were a total of 185 housing units in Greenville. The Town of Greenville had 224 housing units in 2000. Of these, 91.5% were owner occupied. In 2000, Floyd County had 72.5% owner occupied housing and 27.5% renter occupied housing. In 2000, the State of Indiana had 71.4% of owner occupied housing.

 

Income and education are closely linked when analyzing economic data for a community. Almost 50% of Greenville residents age 25 or over have had some college experience and 36.1% having graduated from high school or achieved an equivalent level of education. This high level of education contributes to higher earnings and can also be used as an attraction when bringing new jobs to the town. Future employers would be interested in the higher levels of education in their future workforce.

 

Educational Attainment Total Percent
Population 25 years and over 393 100
Less than 9th grade 21 5.3
9th to 12th grade, no diploma 43 10.9
High school graduate (includes equivalency) 142 36.1
Some college, no degree 89 22.6
Associate degree 19 4.8
Bachelor's degree 59 15
Graduate or professional degree 20 5.1

                      Table 4: Educational Attainment: Census 2000

 

  

EXISTING TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT

 

Transportation in Greenville and the surrounding area occurs primarily via automobile. The following descriptions outline the existing transportation patterns within the town and identify opportunities for expansion and enhancement.

 

Roadways

 

The roads that make up the thoroughfare system in the Greenville area exhibit differing characteristics based on the function they perform. Roadway types range from state highways to local roads. A standardized street functional classification system is used by the Indiana Department of Transportation to describe various roadways. This system groups roadways by their principle use and can be used to compare and analyze the overall circulation system. The roadway classifications used in this plan are: interstate, arterial, and collector. All other roadways are considered local roadways.

 

U.S. 150 is a designated arterial roadway on the INDOT system located within Greenville and surrounding Greenville Township. Both major and minor collectors exist within Greenville. Local minor collectors are Payton and Arthur Coffman Roads. The remaining roads are considered local roads.   From public input, information was gathered regarding the safety factors for Buttontown and Voyles Road.  The speed of traffic along US 150 and the amount of traffic is a paramount issue for local residents. 

 

  

Housing Plan Element

 

With a projected 1.8% population growth rate, Greenville will need to plan for future housing needs. With its high homeownership rates, affordable housing needs to remain an option. Currently the housing price in Greenville is $246,146 a price that is unattainable for most people. The neighboring town of Georgetown has an average listing price of $143,524 and New Albany’s average listing price is $153,000. (source cited) This large price difference can be attributed to the new subdivisions.

 

According to the 2000 Census, the Town had 230 single family dwelling units within its jurisdiction.  Of these units, 21 percent of the housing stock was built before 1950, 65 percent was built before 1980 and the remaining 13 percent was built since 1980.  This data suggests a high percentage of homes are sixty years of age or old.  Of the 21 percent, 17 percent of these homes were owner-occupied.  The aging housing stock indicates a need for the town to explore funding programs to renovate eligible housing stocks to increase energy efficiency and reduce total household spending on heating. 

 

Infrastructure Plan

 

The sizing and location of utilities need to follow the Town's plans for development.

From information gathered through the Town, it appears the Town will have adequate access to water resources to meet the future development needs of the community. 

 

In terms of sanitary sewers, the Town presently does not operate or maintain a sanitary sewer system.  However, there are two sewer treatment facilities located in the area.  The New Albany-Floyd County School System operates a small package plant for the Greenville Elementary School and Theineman Environmental has been permitted to operate a 100,000 gallon package plant facility for the Heritage Springs development located adjacent to Town.

 

A careful and thoughtful engineering and financial analysis should be considered to determine the future sanitary sewer needs for the community.  The expansion of sanitary sewers allows for higher intensity and density of uses within an area.  Any potential expansion should thoroughly examine the financial, engineering, and environmental costs and benefits associated with the development of this type of utility.

 

Greenville is presently outside the federal and state MS 4 requirements.  As these requirements change and more communities are required to comply with the federal clean water requirements, the Town should proactively move towards investigating their storm water drainage needs and how the Town can proactively comply with future storm water regulations.

 

 

Economic Development Plan Element

 

The Town of Greenville has approximately 8 acres presently in defined by the County Assessor’s Office as having commercial activity. The Town has two identifiable commercial sections.  The Central Historic District and the Eastern US 150 Business District.( Insert Appendix, Maps) Also, the Town has a number of home-based businesses scattered amongst the residential land uses throughout Town.

 

In the Eastern Business District, the primary business activities would be considered Highway Service type businesses ranging from convenience store to automobile sales. Within this district, there are also industrial activities such as landscaping and trucking services and, propane tank distribution business. Small scale retail businesses are scattered throughout both districts. In the Central Historic District, small convenience store, restaurant, bank, liquor store, and automotive sales/services store are in operation.  Greenville serves the surrounding community as a small retail and personal services center.  The Town does have a competitive advantage regarding being strategic location on the US 150 corridor for some additional small scale retail commercial activities.

 

 The challenge is to maintain and improve the Town's function as part of a community serving retail and service center. Encouraging small entrepreneurs and attracting more professional service providers in the medical, financial, and legal professions should be a main component of the town’s economic efforts.  The lack of adequate sanitary sewer and hi-speed  internet infrastructure limits the development of surrounding areas as major industrial or business parks.  Other areas within the County have competitive advantages in areas such as proximity to Interstate transportation, municipal sanitary sewer available with capacity and accessibility to hi-speed internet connections to put the town at a significant disadvantage in the development of these types of services.

 

 

Community Facilities and Park Recreation  Plan Element

 

The Town's existing facilities include Greenville Park, which is operated by the New Albany-Floyd County Parks and Recreation Department. There are also recreational facilities in the vicinity of the town are operated by the school system; however, it is unclear if these facilities can be used after-school hours by the public.  A discussion should take place with school officials.  In other communities in the County, the school has partnered with the parks department to encourage usage of the school park sites.

 

The lack of connectivity to the parks also hampers usage.  The Greenville Park does not offer a dedicated trail to allow residents to access the park from side streets located in the Town.  As part of the County Major Thoroughfare Plan, a designated bicycle route is identified to connect along Cross Street to Harrison with a trailhead being located at Greenville Park.

 The location of US 150 and a lack of a safe crossing area limit the ability to use alternative modes of transportation such as walking or bicycling to the Greenville Park.  This lack of a safe connectivity limited the ability of the community to access these community resources. 

 

In terms of other community facilities, the Town Hall is located on Cross Street.  It is small in size and does limit the ability for the Town to conduct large scale community meetings without utilizing other venues.  Also, the lack of a community center limits the ability for residents to interact on a regular basis.  The County has only one main library branch located in New Albany which does limit community involvement.  Also, the Town is served by the Greenville Volunteer Fire Department which is located on the southern section of the Central Historic District.  It appears the Town is adequately served by fire and police protection.

 

The goal is to increase accessibility of existing parks and foster partnerships with Floyd County to increase programs and activities in these parks. To address future demands of the Town, the following community facilities are needed:

 

Historic Preservation Plan Element

 

The Town's historical homes are an important component of life in Greenville, and this plan hopes to address future renovations and developments within this area. This plan addresses the option of taking part in the Main Street Program, and working with the Historic Preservation Commission.  A recently completed Historic Inventory by Historic Landmarks of Southern Indiana provides greater detail on the scope and depth of historic structures located in the Town. 

 

A well-designed urban environment enhances everyone's economic, social and spiritual well-being. The plan proposes to maintain Greenville’s traditional town character, beautify the major entranceways into the Town, protect scenic views and important landmarks, develop guidelines for residential and non-residential development, and work with developers to improve design.

 

EXISTING LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENTAL FRAMEWORK

 

Greenville is fortunate to exhibit the historic, small town atmosphere which is characteristic of Southern Indiana. The historic transportation link of U.S. 150, along with the relatively recent development of nearby interstate 64 have largely determined the settlement and land use patterns of the area. The natural topography of rolling hills and limestone bluffs to the south has encouraged development to spread primarily to the east and west.

 

The following descriptions identify those issues that have a bearing on the future development of Greenville. The text identifies areas of opportunities to expand, preserve, protect or otherwise enhance land uses and activities within Greenville. The descriptions of these areas have been categorized by districts that exhibit similar characteristics in order to make relationships between issues easy to identify. The written descriptions may be referenced by the Plan Commission in making policy decisions regarding planning and zoning issues.

 

Central Historic Area

 

The Central Historic Area is an excellent example of 19th Century linear town development with commercial and residential uses interspersed along a tree-lined streetscape. The main route through Greenville, U.S. 150 is the focus of development with rolling farmland surrounding it. Although each structure carries its own unique history, the districts structures are more important collectively than individually.

 

 

Map 1: Central Greenville

 

The boundaries of the Central Historic Area are defined by Clark Street as the northern boundary, Voyles Road as the western boundary, the Greenville-Georgetown Road as the southern boundary, and Buttontown Road as the eastern boundary of the district. Existing land-uses are primarily residential with commercial uses occurring along US 150.

 

A few historic structures are located within this area, most notably the Greenville Lodge from 1850 and the Jesse Smith House from the 1860’s. As a result of the fire in 1908, however, the majority of buildings are from the early 1900’s. The historic structures are generally in fair condition and provide a potentially unique focus for the character of Greenville.

 

U.S. 150 offers excellent access to this area. However, safety is an issue along the highway due to high speed traffic, very limited parking lots, and pedestrians crossing the road in unpredictable locations and  commercial areas.

 

Land use and development opportunities do exist in this area.  The recognition of the historic character of the central Greenville district is essential and substantive efforts should be made to ensure these characteristics are maintained for future generations of residents.  This can be done through encouraging property owners through façade assistance projects and through regulatory standards to maintain critical historic components of the area.  

 

The Town can promote commercial uses within existing unoccupied commercial structures and should work with State officials in addressing the safety of pedestrians and vehicles along U.S. 150.  Safety along this corridor is an issue to the citizens of Greenville. Future roadwork is an opportunity for the town to slow traffic in the town limits through good road design. By introducing safety features such as curb outs at key intersections and possible medians, and by lowering the speed limit to 30mph in the central district, traffic going through town would be slowed significantly.

 

In addition, a “Welcome to Greenville” sign at both entrances to town would serve to draw motorist’s attention to the town and cause them to slow down. Curb outs could serve to slow traffic by narrowing the roadway and create visual signs of a vibrant town.

 

 

Eastern US 150 Business District

 

Land use along the eastern US 150 corridor is a mix of commercial and light industrial uses with a splattering of residential dwelling. Strip commercial development lines the eastern potion of the corridor. Driveways typically have direct access onto the roadway and development has occurred in an unorganized manner.

 

Residential uses typically front onto US 150 within the older central portion of the corridor. Vehicular access to these lots is accomplished primarily by the use of alleys. Small tracts of farmland and undeveloped open space occur occasionally along the entire length of US 150, providing views into open cultivated fields and the wooded floodplain.

 

Map 1: US 150 Corridor in Greenville

 

The need for a unified sign standard will assist advertising along the roadway while also creating a sense of place for the town.

 

Western Residential Area

 

This area extends west of Voyles Road and west of the Central Historic Area. Development within this area is more extensive than that to the east, due to gentler slopes that are more suitable to development. The existing land-uses in this area are primarily residential with one industrial development north of Clark Street. Access to the roadways within this area is good, although steep topography limits local roadway development in some areas.

 

Eastern Residential Development

 

This area extends east of the US 150 Business Corridor following US 150 to the corporate limit line. Land uses are primarily residential.  The age of the housing stock ranges from early 1900 to present day. Agricultural land to the north has experienced limited development. Residential subdivisions have developed with access of US 150. Greenville Park is located within the area, and serves surrounding residents. Rolling hills characterize this area, with steeper slopes adjacent to small drainage ways. Thus, the topography is generally well suited to residential development with improvements to existing local road systems.

 

 

PROPOSED LAND USE

 

The following descriptions illustrate general land-use scenarios for future development within Greenville. These descriptions, along with the Proposed Land Use Map, target areas where future development and preservation should occur. The Land Use Plan and the following descriptions provide a tool to guide future land-use decisions based on the goals and objectives previously identified.

Residential Land Use

 

Residential land use of defined as land that is primarily used for the construction of residential buildings and public facilities that support residential areas such as schools and churches. The proposed Land Use Plan delineates general areas for the expansion of existing residential areas.

 

Greenville’s residential area, shown in yellow on the Land Use Map, consists primarily of single-family residential housing. Although further building of housing on the few remaining empty lots within corporate limits of Greenville is possible, any future housing expansion of any significance would most likely occur just outside the corporate limits or in territory to be annexed by the Town in the future.

 

 Such future expansion would most likely be in areas where subdivision tracts are developed on land sold to developers by families in the area. These types of developments will need to be coordinated with the Greenville Town Council since the houses and families they bring into the area will greatly impact the road conditions, school capacity and services currently provided by the town.

 

Multi-family residential uses area not specifically identified on the Land Use Plan based on the present lack of adequate sanitary sewer service which would be required for this type of intensity and density of development. If such higher density residential development is allowed, it should be adjacent to US 150 corridor and be located in or adjacent to the US 150 Business Corridor as described previously. New multi-family development should be located within transition areas between singe family residences and commercial and industrial uses. Appropriate screening and landscaping should be developed to buffer adjacent land uses.

 

 Commercial Land Use

 

The commercial-use designation includes retail, professional and business services and offices, restaurants, auto sales and service and personal establishments. Commercial designations on the proposed Land Use Plan typically represent existing commercial development and are indicated on the Land Use Map in red.

 

No expanded commercial uses are shown within the corporate limits of Greenville. Strip commercial development should be discouraged adjacent to existing residential development due to safety, noise and traffic conflicts. New commercial development should be promoted within existing commercial lots. Special effort should be given to find tenants for the vacant commercial buildings along U.S. 150. Unique commercial uses should be promoted within the existing historical district. Streetscape and parking improvements along U.S. 150 could enhance the image of this area.

 

Industrial Land Use

 

Industrial uses are indicated in purple. The industrial-use designation includes manufacturing, wholesale, warehousing, distribution, solid waste facilities and salvage. Any future development or redevelopment of industrial lands will need to consider traffic, noise, proximity to residential uses, and the capacity for sanitary sewers.  Also, due to the lack of competitive advantages in industrial development with other areas of the county, any new industrial development will need to indicate how it can overcome the competitive advantages of sewer capacity, internet capacity and proximity to major transportation corridors.

 

Recreation and Conservation Land Use

 

Parks, recreation areas, nature preserves, erosion control areas, unique woodlands and wetlands are land uses included in this category. Connectivity to Greenville Park and to the Greenville School Parkland should be aggressively explored. Overall improvements are necessary to the vehicular entrance, parking and pathways. Additionally a conservation area could be established using flood prone lands which could be used as parklands when dry. 

 

Greenville Present Land Use Patterns: Current (2009)

 

 

TRANSPORTATION PLAN ELEMENT

 

The availability of transportation routes throughout the jurisdiction has largely determined the manner in which the area has developed. It is the intent of the Transportation Plan to anticipate the future needs of this system. The overall goal of this section is to make recommendations based on these needs to insure the safe and efficient movement of people and goods.

 

Transportation routes are not typically limited by the political boundaries of the cities, towns, townships, and counties. Therefore, roadways act as lines of connection between differing areas. This plan will offer an overall look at the system and will aid in the efforts of the town and county to plan future improvements. The transportation plan has been formulated based on the conditions of existing circulation outlined earlier, and in light of the needs of the proposed land uses outlined in the Land Use Plan.

 

Roadway development standards are necessary in order to ensure that the type of roadways specified meet a particular transportation need. The Transportation Plan is based on accepted State and national standards which describe the level of use that a particular roadway should accept.

 

The Transportation Plan element map graphically depicts the location of various roadway classifications. The classifications remain largely the same as those described earlier in Chapter 1.

 

US 150 offer Greenville excellent access to the New Albany and Louisville metropolitan areas. US 150 is classified by the State of Indiana as a major collector, but for the purposes of this plan it acts as an arterial, connecting the lower volume collectors with I-64. Vehicular access along the US 150 corridor throughout the jurisdiction should be carefully controlled to minimize the number of driveways and pull-off parking from the roadway. Improvements to this roadway should be explored within Greenville to address sidewalks, curbs, drainage, lighting and street trees. The historic character of the area should be reflected in the improvements.

 

With increasing development in and around the Greenville area an absolute certainty, attention should be given to improving local roads and minor collectors to better facilitate the smooth flow of traffic in the future. Immediate attention should be given to improving traffic flow conditions on Cross Street where school traffic frequently causes major congestion an the narrow road increases traffic hazards. The possibility of obtaining a traffic signal at this intersection has been examined as this would help prevent traffic congestion during the highest traffic load times; however traffic is too light to warrant a traffic light.  

 

Road improvements to several locations are necessary within Greenville’s town limits. Among these are the intersections of Voyles and Buttontown Road to US 150, where improvement to sightlines is needed.

 

INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN ELEMENT

 

As previously stated, the Town should carefully and thoughtfully analyze the prospective of introduction of sanitary sewer into the Town.  A well-defined cost analysis should be considered in the decision-making process as well as long-range effects in terms of development trends, operational cost, and spurring higher density development.  In this review, the concept of conservation design should be considered as a planning and development tool to balance density and rural character.

 

ECONOMIC PLAN ELEMENT

 

The Town should consider the creation of a Main Street Organization to heighten aware of the businesses in the Central and Eastern districts.  A detailed marketing and needs analysis should be considered in attempting to foster more professional based businesses to locate in the Town.  Beautification programs along US 150 and place making activities such as holiday banners, street art, and welcome signage should be considered as a way to reinforce the uniqueness of the Town.

 

COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND RECREATION PLAN ELEMENT

 

The Town should consider the development of safe routes to school program.  This program develops safe routes for children to walk and bicycle to school.  The lack of these facilities and the current speed limits established by INDOT hinder the development of pedestrian mobility in the community.

 

In terms of parks, the Town should consider any new development over a certain acreage or density require a set aside of land for parkland.  Also, the Town should consider the feasibility of the creation of a community center facility located near the school or park to increase community involvement.   Also, the Town should consider participating in the development of the County’s designated bicycle route that enter the Town.

 

HISTORIC PRESERVATION PLAN ELEMENT

 

A top priority of the Town should be the creation of zoning tools in the Central District to ensure the character of the Town are not lost during re-development.  One alternative would be the creation of a mixed use zoning district that would allow property owners flexibility in certain residential and commercial uses within the community.  Any redevelopment should require a formal process similar to a planned unit development approach which would provide the community with a greater level of input.

 

Also, the Town should consider the development of municipal preservation commission.  The Town should explore the feasibility of how this authority could protect the unique historic features of Greenville.  The Town should start the process of gaining membership into the

GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES

 

The comprehensive Plan portrays an idealized vision of Greenville’s future. The following recommendations are based on goals and objectives identified by the Planning and Zoning Commission during the planning process used to prepare this document. The recommendations of this Plan are a product of public interest and initiative created to guide future development decisions in both the short and long term.

 

The recommendations are presented as specific strategies necessary for the implementation of the goals and objectives of the citizens of Greenville. The strategies will require careful monitoring to evaluate their appropriateness in light of changing economic and social conditions. The Comprehensive Plan and its recommendations should be updated periodically (every five years) to insure that it reflects current needs and trends that may impact development. A detailed list of goals, objectives and implementation strategies follows. Each goal is stated along with accompanying objectives. Beneath each objective is a strategy specific to that issue.

 

Goal 1: Transportation

 

U.S. 150 is a major arterial that runs through the town and severely hinders community connectivity. Drivers are confused by the various speeds posted throughout town ranging from 50 to 25 MPH.  As a result, the speeds on US 150 make pedestrian travel extremely unattainable especially at Cross Street.

 

Greenville recognizes that U.S. 150 will remain a high traffic area, but hope that improvements such as sidewalk will be made to increase pedestrian connectivity. Residents have identified all intersections with US 150 in the town as being dangerous. However, they determined Voyles Road, Cross Street, Pekin Road, and Buttontown Road as being the most dangerous and the site of many accidents. As a result they would concentrate improvements to these intersections, with the hope that this would increase the overall safety of the town’s residents.

 

Objective: Increase local automobile and pedestrian safety

 

Strategy: Work with INDOT to reduce speed limits in Central District

 

Strategy: Work with INDOT and other State officials to review placement of speed limit zones and rational on their requirement. 

 

Strategy:  Install sidewalks along US 150 to increase safety and provide an alternative mode of transportation for local residents.  The Town should seek grant money for pedestrian improvements

 

Strategy: Encourage landscaping throughout downtown to maintain rural character and provide a strong sense of place.

 

Strategy: Investigate the feasibility of curbouts or traffic islands to provide pedestrian travel with safe areas in order to transverse the Town especially improved pedestrian crossing at Cross Street

 

Objective: Improve dangerous intersections along US 150

 

Strategy: Work with INDOT to identify most dangerous intersections and possible state improvements; suggest moving intersections of Voyles Road or Buttontown Road to improve sight line and decrease accidents

 

Strategy: Increase safety at Cross Street with a turn lane; during peak school hours enforce speed limit of 25 mph; position police car at Cross Street with flashing lights to slow traffic

 

Goal 2: Revitalize Downtown

 

In meetings with the town, residents have expressed a desire to remain a rural town. They realize their proximity to larger metropolitan areas mean that there will be growth, and are creating a comprehensive plan in order to regulate growth fitting with their small-town character. They also want to encourage small neighborhood businesses along US 150 in their downtown. They want to create a stronger sense of community through civic projects and competitions.

 

Objective: Maintain town’s architectural integrity

 

Strategy: Create architectural guidelines for new downtown construction which detail acceptable housing styles, materials, and design

 

Strategy: Utilize Floyd County Historical Structures survey for identifying important structures in town

 

Strategy: Mandate conformance for new construction to height and width requirements established in the zoning ordinance

 

Strategy: Establish the manner in which buildings are expected to relate to and shape the space between them;

 

Objective: Strengthen the City’s economic base by stimulation of conservation and reuse

 

Strategy: Apply for restoration grant money for renovating neglected houses and vacant lots ensuring the preservation of property values through Town

 

Strategy: Encourage landscaping along downtown corridor; involve citizens through contests

 

Strategy: Promote the use of historic landmarks to attract visitors

 

Strategy: Hang town flags from telephone poles along corridor in downtown

 

Strategy: Involve school children landscaping and historic projects within community

 

Strategy: Involve residents in seasonal street cleanup

 

Objective: Encourage pedestrian traffic in downtown area

 

Strategy: Improve bike and pedestrian safety through identifying key pedestrian and bike corridors

 

Strategy: Install benches for residents along sections of these corridors

 

Strategy: Connect businesses, residences, and parks with pedestrian trails or signs with maps on them

 

Strategy: Install community art and place-making projects involving local residents and schools

 

Strategy: Create a community meeting place for a message board and starting place for activities

 

Objective: Maintain integrity of housing stock in Greenville

 

Strategy: Apply for CDBG and HOME funding to provide money for rehabilitation projects

 

Strategy: Apply for entrance to the in the Indiana Main Street Program to expand community enhancement opportunities

 

Strategy: Encourage and aid citizens wishing to list buildings on the National Register for Historic Places; list Greenville downtown as a historic district

 

Goal 3: Infrastructure

 

Currently Greenville has no sewage treatment service. There is a sewage treatment plant on the outskirts of town in the Heritage Springs subdivision, which could theoretically be built out to include the downtown area. Issues arise whether that would be feasible from a cost standpoint or if that would allow unwanted development in the town. There are currently no mass-transit options to New Albany or the city of Louisville, where many residents work.

 

Objective: Determine the best alternative approach to sewage treatment for Greenville

 

Strategy: Conduct a preliminary engineering feasibility report that would determine a best method approach to providing sewage treatment to the Town.  A key element of any report should contain a cost benefit analysis and growth analysis to determine a method which would not dramatically alter Town’s rural character.

 

Objective: Stormwater runoff issues

 

Strategy: Fund a feasibility study for stormwater drainage issues in Greenville

 

Strategy: Acquire flood prone land for parks or open spaces

 

Strategy: Encourage and educate on the use of rain gardens for businesses prone to flooding

 

Objective: Determine if there is a need for park and ride/rural transit in Greenville

 

Strategy: Conduct a survey for a Park & Ride program or on-call bus network

 

Strategy: Identify potential grant sources for mass-transit and potential sites for these services

 

Objective: Establish a municipal parking lot

 

Strategy: Determine available plots of land, work with owners to acquire and pave as a parking lot

 

Strategy: New businesses along US 150 should provide parking behind their buildings to maintain cohesive downtown facade

 

Goal 4: Parks and Open Spaces

 

Currently Greenville has two nice public parks. One is the Greenville Park, situated on the eastern side of town, the other is a small park located behind Greenville Elementary School. While the parks are well maintained, they lack activities for youth and seniors. Greenville has expressed an interest in providing more activities for these age groups, particularly along the lines of skateboarding ramps for youth.

 

Objective: Add more activities for youth and seniors

 

Strategy: Coordinate with Floyd County Parks Department on outdoor activities in Greenville Park

 

Strategy: Identify local wildlife and create tours for all age groups pointing out these birds/flowers/trees

 

Strategy: Seek grant monies for more parks equipment in the town park

 

Strategy: Examine suitable sites for a community center, explore funding opportunities

 

Strategy: Explore funding options for bike trails/pedestrian trails to connect subdivisions and the town

 

Objective: Retain rural character around city limits

 

Strategy: Create a conservation district or a greenbelt around town

 

Strategy: For new developments require conservation subdivision design

 

  

Appendix

 

 

Implementation Matrix

Land Use Maps

 

 Goal 1: Housing

 

Community Policy

Implementation Steps

Responsible Parties

Time Frame

Measurement of success

Establish zoning regulations to implement comprehensive plan

Draft new ordinance for new zoning districts

Municipal Plan Commission


Town Council

Fall 2009

Passage of new zoning ordinance

Entrance in Indiana Main Street Program

Apply for entrance using Floyd County Historic Structures inventory

Town Council

 

Organization of a Main Street Group

Fall 2009

Acceptance as into Indiana Main Street Program

Town/citizens list buildings on National Register for Historic Places

Simplify application process

 

Conduct informational meetings to assist applicants

Town Council

 

Historic Society of Floyd County

 

Historic Landmarks of Southern Indiana

 

Fall 2010

Acceptance of downtown/buildings to National Register

Determine eligibility for CDBG and HOME funding

Complete income survey of town

 

Town Council

 

County Planner

Spring 2009

 

 

Completion of survey

 

 

 

 

 

Goal 2: Transportation

 

Community Policy

Implementation Steps

Responsible Parties

Time Frame

Measurement of success

Establish continuous 35mph speed limit

Work with INDOT and State elected officials

Town Council

Fall 2009

Posting of new speed limit

Continuous sidewalks in downtown area

Work with INDOT and State elected officials

INDOT

 

Town Council

Fall 2010

Sidewalks throughout downtown

Landscaping throughout downtown area

Implement community planting activities

Town Council

Continuous process

 

Establish pedestrian crossing at Cross Street

Prepare study on feasibility of various crossing types

INDOT

 

Town Council

Spring 2009

Passage of appropriate crossing

 

 

 

Goal 3: Infrastructure

 

Community Policy

Implementation Steps

Responsible Parties

Time Frame

Measurement of Success

Determine feasibility of best method for sanitary sewer development plant

Conduct cost-benefit analysis, feasibility study

Town Council

Fall 2010

If financially feasible and desired by community, determine best course of action

Conduct study of flood prone areas in Greenville

Explore options to reduce flooding

Town Council

Fall 2010

 

Acquire flood prone land for parks or open spaces

 

Town Council

Ongoing process

Preservation of environmentally sensitive areas

Identify funding sources for improvements

Identify local, state, and federal funding opportunities

County Planner

 

Town Council

Ongoing process

 

Promote use of rain gardens/rain barrels

Develop a public outreach program

County Planner

 

County Ag. Extension

 

Town Council

Fall 2010

Public Workshops

Determine need for public transit

Conduct a feasibility analysis

County Planner

 

Town Council

Fall 2011

 

Identify suitable parking lot site

Prepare preliminary study of suitable parking areas in town

County Planner

 

Town Council

Fall 2010

Municipal Parking Lot

 

 

 

Goal 4: Parks and Open Spaces

 

Community Policy

Implementation Steps

Responsible Parties

Time Frame

Measurement of Success

Partner for more activities for youth and seniors

Development of activities program

Floyd County Parks Department,

 

Town Council

Winter 2009

 

Determine suitable site and funding for community center

Conduct feasibility study of sites and determine possible funding sources

Town Council

Fall 2012

Procurement of funding and site

Determine suitable sites and funding for trail network

Research possible funding and position of trail system

Town Council

Summer 2010

Public Meetings

Create a conservation area around town

Determine feasibility and evaluate potential growth

Floyd County Planner

Town Council

Fall 2010

Passage of new zoning district

 

 

 

Goal 5: Revitalize Downtown

 

Community Policy

Implementation Steps

Responsible Parties

Time Frame

Measurement of Success

Identify and preserve historical structures

Develop a town preservation plan for historic structures

Town Council

 

Public

Ongoing

Pubic Forums

Promote and encourage community spirit

Develop community beautification plan

Town Council

Fall 2009

Decrease in commercial and residential vacancies

Create a landscaping plan

Determine suitable plants and involve community in planting

Town Council

 

Public

Spring 2010

Implementation of program

Conduct pedestrian study on improvements for pedestrians in town

Create inventory of improvements and affected areas

Town Council

Fall 2009

More pedestrian activity

Promoting community art

Network with resident artists and school

Town Council

Fall 2009

 

Install community board

Network with residents

Town Council

Fall 2009